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Netflix Tests Playing Ads Between Episodes

Netflix is testing a new feature which inserts video promos between episodes of the show you’re currently watching. Unsurprisingly, the users who have been involved in the testing have expressed their outrage at what they see as the introduction of adverts.
Unlike some streaming services, such as The Roku Channel, which offers free movies with ads, Netflix charges cold, hard cash. Which means users don’t want to see commercials interrupting their binge-watching marathons. Netflix didn’t get the memo.
Video Promos for Netflix Originals According to TechCrunch, Netflix is currently testing whether it’s a good idea to show users ads for its own shows in between episodes. Testers report that after an episode ends, a video for a Netflix Original will start playing, with the onus on the user to skip it.
While these video promos are skippable, they’re still an unnecessary intrusion on a binge-watching session. And seeing as the capacity to binge on shows without any interruptions is one of..

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Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder Location

Netflix does allow you to download movies and shows offline with the Windows 10 Netflix app. That’s why the location of the Netflix download folder becomes important. Netflix as yet does not give you an option to change the download location. Also, it does not allow you to browse to the place where your downloads are saved.
If your drive is filling up fast, you can manually move the downloads to another location. When you want to watch them again, copy them back to the original location.
Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder Open File Explorer from the Task Bar. The Netflix folder is a hidden folder. To display it, go to the View tab and then click on the Option menu button on the right. In Folder Options, select the View tab and scroll to the Files and Folders settings. If it’s not checked, then select the Show Hidden files, folders, and drives setting to enable it. Click OK. From the File Explorer, you can navigate to the Netflix download folder. The full path is: C:Users[USE..

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How to Make Your Own Private Netflix Using Dropbox, Google Drive, or OneDrive

Given the amount of content on offer, Netflix offers phenomenal value for money.
However, if you’ve already got an extensive library of locally saved TV shows and movies (perhaps because you spent time ripping your old DVDs to digitize your collection), you might not want to pay for Netflix.
So, why not use Google Drive, OneDrive, or Dropbox in conjunction with Kodi to make your own private Netflix?
Warning: Don’t download TV shows and movies illegally. This process should only use content that you legally own. Watching pirated material could land you in trouble with the law.
What You’ll Need to Get Started There are two ways to make your own private Netflix. You can either use the cloud storage providers’ desktop apps and point your Kodi library at the synced folder, or you can use the companies’ official Kodi plugins.
We’ll explain both methods. But first, there are some steps you need to take regardless of which process you decide to use.
Firstly, download and install Kodi. It..

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